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frenchhistory:


Cachet du général en chef de l’armée de l’Ouest (1794).

The Army of the West (armée de l’Ouest) was one of the French Revolutionary Armies. It was created on 1 August 1793 by merging the armée des côtes de Brest, the armée des côtes de La Rochelle, and the armée de Mayence, and was sent to fight the revolt in the Vendee.

frenchhistory:

Cachet du général en chef de l’armée de l’Ouest (1794).

The Army of the West (armée de l’Ouest) was one of the French Revolutionary Armies. It was created on 1 August 1793 by merging the armée des côtes de Brest, the armée des côtes de La Rochelle, and the armée de Mayence, and was sent to fight the revolt in the Vendee.

(Source: archives.vendee.fr)

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  • Enjolras: IT'S TIME TO TRYYYYY DEFYING MONARCHY
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In which Jaime required coffee in order to sit through the wedding vows. [x]

(Source: maimedlion, via hellotailor)

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Fuck Yes Friday

agoodcartoon:

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fuck yes.

(via tweetonslacarmagnole)

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jesuit-space-pirate:

Around Easter 1945, days before the arrival of American troops in Dortmund, ca. 300 people were murdered by the Gestapo in a place called the Bittermark. They were prisoners of war and forced labourers from France, Poland, the Soviet Union, Belgium, the Netherlands and other countries, as well as political prisoners from Germany. Their arms were bound with barbed wire, they were taken into the forest, shot, and buried in bomb craters. The son of one of the victims, a local miner, found the bodies. Most were never identified. As for the perpetrators, 27 were put on trial seven years later, of whom 15 were acquitted, not because it couldn’t be proven that they’d done it, but because they had only been carrying out orders; the rest received prison sentences of 2-6 years (a 28th, who had been on the run in 1952, was tried in ‘54 and got 8 years) - not a single one was convicted of murder. This isn’t very surprising if you consider that the police and justice system were full of officers who had been in the Gestapo themselves, judges who’d already been judges under Hitler, etc.

Every year on Good Friday, there is a commemoration at the memorial in the park, and because one of the known victims, Heinrich Czerkus, was a member of Borussia Dortmund, there is also a memorial run (or walk, or you can ride a bike…) from the old stadium Rote Erde to the Bittermark. On the way through the forest, you can read the biographies of some of the murdered on trees along the path; on the way back, people lay down flowers under these trees. In recent years, the commemoration is always accompanied by an appeal not to let neonazis appropriate the 1st of May. (In 2009 they ‘celebrated’ this day - which was made a national holiday for the first time under National Socialism, renamed “Day of National Labour” - by attacking trade unionists at their big rally,* but more recently they’ve been trying to appear as a legitimate political party and have established a new tradition of marching ‘peacefully’ through the city on this day.)

And at the end, this song, which was written by political prisoners in Börgermoor II concentration camp in 1933, is always sung. (I’m using this particular video because it’s supposedly from a union meeting in Dortmund!)

Anecdote: Last year, the president of Borussia Dortmund spoke at the commemoration, and consequently also stayed and joined in singing the song. Whereupon the local neonazis, who’ve been banned from the football stadium, announced that he ought to ban himself from his own stadium as a left-wing extremist for singing “that communist song”.

Here are the two verses I’ve got in English, plus one I translated myself because I think leaving it out changes the sense of the song:

Far and wide as the eye can wander
Heath and bog are everywhere
Not a bird sings out to cheer us
Oaks are standing gaunt and bare
We are the peat-bog soldiers
We’re marching with our spades
To the bog

Up and down the post are pacing
No one, no one can go through
Flight would mean a sure death facing
Guns and barbed wire greet out view
We are the peat-bog soldiers
We’re marching with our spades
To the bog

But for us there’s no complaining:
One day winter has to end
And then we shall gladly say
Homeland, you are mine again!
And then we peat-bog soldiers
No longer march with spades
To the bog

*To get an idea of the nazis’ numbers: they were around 300 strong on this occasion.

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"Ce qu’il y eut de remarquable dans cet épouvantable déluge de sang, ce fut l’impassibilité des victimes, le calme et le sang-froid des neuf cents femmes qui courbèrent la tête sous le triangle d’acier. Toutes moururent à merveille, mieux que des hommes: toutes, sauf deux, la mère Duchesne qu’on fut obligé de monter sur l’échafaud, et la royale courtisane qui, déshonorent la guillotine comme elle avait déshonoré la trône, hurla de peur, se pâma, eut la chair de poule devant la couteau: ‘Au nom du ciel, grace! monsieur le bourreau!’ Sous le couperet elle criait encore."
From Les femmes enceintes devant le tribunal révolutionnaire, by Max Billard.
What an asshole.

"Ce qu’il y eut de remarquable dans cet épouvantable déluge de sang, ce fut l’impassibilité des victimes, le calme et le sang-froid des neuf cents femmes qui courbèrent la tête sous le triangle d’acier. Toutes moururent à merveille, mieux que des hommes: toutes, sauf deux, la mère Duchesne qu’on fut obligé de monter sur l’échafaud, et la royale courtisane qui, déshonorent la guillotine comme elle avait déshonoré la trône, hurla de peur, se pâma, eut la chair de poule devant la couteau: ‘Au nom du ciel, grace! monsieur le bourreau!’ Sous le couperet elle criait encore."

From Les femmes enceintes devant le tribunal révolutionnaire, by Max Billard.

What an asshole.

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Is there anything douchier than criticizing someone for not dying gracefully enough?

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Fouquier-Tinville

Fouquier-Tinville