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The French Revolution was one of the most far-reaching social and political upheavals in modern history spanning 10 years and involving the execution of the King, collapse of monarchy and slaughter of thousands at the guillotine. Starring Richard E Grant and Sally Hawkins, comedy trio The Penny Dreadfuls will attempt to tell the epic story of the Revolution in one hour, with jokes.

The play’s two main characters are Maximilien Robespierre the dictatorial architect of the Reign of Terror, who sent thousands to their death and Marie-Therese, the 16 year old daughter of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI.

Marie-Therese was incarcerated for three years by the revolutionaries. When she was locked up her father, mother, aunt and little brother were also with her. After the execution of her father the rest of the family were moved to another part of the tower and Marie-Therese was kept in solitary confinement. It is recorded that Robespierre visited Marie-Therese at one point in the tower but there is no historical record of that conversation. This play is that conversation.

Revolution is written by comedy trio The Penny Dreadfuls, Humphrey Ker, David Reed and Thom Tuck, all successful in their own rights as solo performers and all taking their own shows to Edinburgh this year. Last year they wrote an Afternoon Play for Radio about Guy Fawkes and they have previously had two series of The Brothers Faversham broadcast on Radio 7

(Source: bunniesandbeheadings)

Text

"Death to the Reds!"

iron-imperialist:

valdsbejakande:

class-struggle-anarchism:

allpowerviolencetothesoviets:

iron-imperialist:

-unifying idea and battle-cry of Baron von Ungern-Sternberg’s army

these people unironically support folks who’s names start ‘Baron von’ it’s quite amazing

hah was that what he said right before the Red Army shot him in the face?

Go and meet your Tsar, white scum

Death FROM the reds. Easy mistake to make.

Never met a Red who was up the the task. You feeling lucky?

Hmm… Honestly, I can’t write anything that is embarrasingly tryhard enough to be a worthy reply to this. I’ll just leave this here as a placeholder, and I’m sure you’ll think of something yourself.

Photo
needsmoreresearch:

teadrunktailor:

french-revolutionary:

ice—-queen:

colonialliamross on deviantart


Haha, Marat is making the rounds again. It’s not the first time it’s migrated from deviantArt over here. I was actually thinking of this costume the other day when one of the songs from my Marat playlist came on. Should queue up some more photos…

always gonna reblog this

needsmoreresearch:

teadrunktailor:

french-revolutionary:

ice—-queen:

colonialliamross on deviantart

Haha, Marat is making the rounds again. It’s not the first time it’s migrated from deviantArt over here. I was actually thinking of this costume the other day when one of the songs from my Marat playlist came on. Should queue up some more photos…

always gonna reblog this

(via thusthusthus)

Tags: best
Photoset

(Source: sizvideos, via feuillyova)

Text

"Death to the Reds!"

class-struggle-anarchism:

allpowerviolencetothesoviets:

iron-imperialist:

-unifying idea and battle-cry of Baron von Ungern-Sternberg’s army

these people unironically support folks who’s names start ‘Baron von’ it’s quite amazing

hah was that what he said right before the Red Army shot him in the face?

Go and meet your Tsar, white scum

Death FROM the reds. Easy mistake to make.

Photoset
Quote
"I loved him like a mistress."

Camille Desmoulins, on Mirabeau . Quoted in George Morgan’s The True LaFayette (pg 300)

IIRC, it’s from the Vieux Cordelier, and he’s actually quoting Robespierre’s speech in his defense from the Jacobin club.

(via valdsbejakande)

Oh! I think you’re right that it’s from the Vieux Cordelier, but I’m not entirely sure about the Robespierre part? In issue 5 Camille responds to insinuations that he had a habit of putting his individual friendships above the Revolution (not fitting of a true patriot!). He talks about his friendships with Barnave and Lameth, then mentions Mirabeau and how he loved him like a mistress. I think this is where the ‘I loved him like a mistress’ paraphrase comes from. 

Unfortunately I can’t find a link to issue 5 in the original French (I could only find 1 and 2— will try again later), otherwise I would link you that, but I did find one for an English translation! Credit to simone-remy over on Live Journal for this translation.


"It is very easy for patriots from August 10, patriots from the third or fourth year, now that money and high office are almost a disaster, to dress themselves up in incorruptibility for a day. Did Necker, at the height of his glory, and after his second recall to office look to appeal, like me, to the business of bakers? In the glory days of his fortune was Lafayette applauded by his aides de camps when they left his house and crossed his antechamber? Did those slippery, almost unavoidable traps encircle Bellechasse? Were their eyes tempted by more seductive charms? Their hands by the lure of a rich dowry? Their ambition by the opportunity of a ministry? Their indolence by a beautiful house in the Pyrenees? A more difficult test was put, that of renouncing the friendship of Barnave and Lameth and to tear myself away from Mirabeau whom I had idolised and loved like a mistress. With all their advantages they preferred to flee? Were they obliged to condemn so many of their friends with whom they had begun the revolution?” (source)

Anyway it’s entirely possible that someplace else there’s some sort of mention of the Robespierre bit you mentioned! I know he does quote him, but I just don’t think he quotes Robespierre mentioning the mistress thing. Still I have not read the entire issue, nor all the issues! However, I believe this is where the ‘loved like a mistress’ quote came from, and it appears to be Camille speaking directly for himself.

SUPER SLICK EDIT: here’s the French!

(via unspeakablevice)

He doesn’t say in the text that it is a reference to Robespierre speech, but

(from volume 10 of Robespierre’s collected works)

This was earlier than n°5, frimaire vs nivôse

(via bunniesandbeheadings)

Quote
"[A terrorist from Villefranche-sur-Saone] has not stopped since the revolution of the 9th Thermidor to corrupt the public by loudly saying in municipal assemblies that Robespierre had died a victim of the Revolution and of his patriotism, that the party now dominating them was that of the aristocracy, and that in little time the martyr Robespierre would be pantheonized."

[[Un terroriste de Villefranche-sur-Saône a pas] discontinué depuis la révolution du 9 thermidor de corrompre l’espirit public en disant hautement dans des assemblées de commune que Robespierre étoit mort victim de la Révolution et de son patriotisme,que le parti qui dominoit actuellement étoit celuis de l’aristocratie, que dans peu de tems le martyr Robespierre seroit panthéonisé.]]

Police report from the comite de surveillance de Villefrance, séances des 17 et 22 nivose an III. Quoted from Richard Cobb’s The Police and the People (1972). [Poor] translation by me.

(via bunniesandbeheadings)

Tags: gpoy?
Quote
"The people of Paris thought that in removing Robespierre they were destroying tyranny, whereas the purpose of his removal was to make it flourish more luxuriantly than ever. But once Robespierre had fallen, the explosion was such that in spite of all their efforts, the Terrorists were never able to gain the upper hand again."

Napoleon on Maximilien Robespierre during his banishment to St. Helena  (via viverobespierre)

wow even Napoleon calls it

(via unspeakablevice)

(via unspeakablevice)

Quote
"I loved him like a mistress."

Camille Desmoulins, on Mirabeau . Quoted in George Morgan’s The True LaFayette (pg 300)

IIRC, it’s from the Vieux Cordelier, and he’s actually quoting Robespierre’s speech in his defense from the Jacobin club.

(Source: unspeakablevice)